• PROGRAMS

    Triple E - EEE

    CLUBS/CO-CURRICULAR

    Concert Band Orchestra Madrigals/Chorus Student Government Recreational
    Sports
    Service
    Academic
    Visual Arts
    Culinary Arts
    Informal Music
    Rock Band in School
    Other Fine Arts/Music Book
    Gaming
    Media
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Park Elementary School

Park
  • Indicator(s) Chosen - 1, 5, 6, 10 (expand to view details)

    View Full List/Descriptions of Indicators

    Indicator 1. INCREASE THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS, FAMILIES, STAFF, AND PARTNERS WHO REPORT FEELING LIKE A VALUABLE MEMBER OF THE SCHOOL OR SCHOOL SYSTEM COMMUNITY

    Indicator 5. INCREASE THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS WHO READ ON OR ABOVE GRADE LEVEL BY THE END OF SECOND GRADE

    Indicator 6. INCREASE THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS IN GRADES 3-8 WHO MEET OR EXCEED EXPECTATIONS ON STANDARDIZED READING, LANGUAGE ARTS, AND MATHEMATICS ASSESSMENTS

    Indicator 10.  INCREASE THE PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS ATTENDING SCHOOL ON A DAILY BASIS


    REASONS FOR SELECTING INDICATORS

    Traditional MSDE and/or school-based student data

    • Attendance Rates
    • Numbers of  FARMS students
    • LEP (Limited English Proficiency) students 
    • Title I Status 
    • Student Mobility Rate
    • Quarterly Assessments scores - English
    • PARCC Scores - English/Language Arts (Elementary grades 3, 4, 5)

    Reading: The AACPS curriculum redesign to include professional development and resources for guided reading instruction has been of great benefit in efforts to increase the numbers of students reading on or above grade level. Continued progress monitoring throughout the school year has helped to track student data more closely and be responsive to student needs. Despite all of this, our students struggle to read on grade level text. Teachers diagnostically look at student data to see if accuracy or comprehension are to blame when students do not meet success. Data analysis shows that for students in grades 1-5, they do not progress to the next level of text largely because they struggle with comprehension. A school-wide focus for the 2018-2019 school year will include work around helping students retell and summarize. The opposite is observed for students in Kindergarten, as they begin to learn letter sound relationships. While there have been many strategies reviewed to address comprehension difficulties, the following is a list of what has worked well at Park to meet student needs: • Anchor charts • Independent Reading Logs paired with Reading Response Journals • Explicit Academic Vocabulary Instruction • Guided Reading Conferencing tailored to individual student needs • Interactive Read Aloud & Explicit Comprehension Lessons • Active Engagement strategies PARCC and district assessments in the area of reading continue to call for a need to focus on literature and informational text standard 1. Students in grades 2-5 struggle to answer the Part B portion of questions correctly. The Part B portion calls for students to go back into the text and locate text evidence. Improving student reading levels, building perseverance and stamina should address this issue. Explicit comprehension lessons in grades 3-5 have also really helped to build comprehension skills and improve assessment outcomes. Students also need continued support in test taking strategies to eliminate tricky answer choices and focus on the best answer.  Attendance: Despite an extensive list of interventions aimed at improving student attendance during the 2016-2017 school year and 2017-2018 school year, attendance continues to be an alarming area of concern, as our attendance percentage is 93.88%. Overall, 66% of our school population has missed at least 5 days of school during the 2017-2018 academic year. Additionally, 41% of our students are considered excessively absent and have missed at least 10 days during that time frame. One of our biggest events to reward students who have missed less than 8 days of school is the annual Carnival. Despite encouraging parents to sign an attendance contract and heavily promoting the carnival, chronic attendance issues continue to be a problem. It has been well documented that attendance in elementary school is a reliable indicator of graduation rates among our students. To ensure that each of our students graduates from high school, we must work to improve the daily attendance. Each absence results in missed instruction which leads to learning gaps for our students. Despite our efforts to provide weekly, quarterly and yearly incentives for attendance and discipline, both continue to be a concern.

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    OUR VISION OF SUCCESS  - 2 year results

    Students will see a large collection of books in the school, teachers who are excited about the teaching of literacy, and a welcoming environment that includes a variety of seating opportunities for independent reading. Students will say that they love coming to school, they love reading, that they are having discussions about books, and they express confidence in themselves as readers.

    Adults will see a high level of student engagement, a high level of teacher enthusiasm, students engaged in a high level of rigorous work and students excited about literacy. Community members will see an increased number of children at the county and school libraries. Food Service workers and bus drivers will see students carrying and reading books. Adults will say that they are happy and satisfied with children attending Park Elementary. They will say that our school is college and career focused and we encourage students to apply for magnet middle schools.

Our School Story

  • Year School Opened - 1943
    School Renovation Details - Park Elementary was a complete renovation which resulted in a new building. The building was transformed from a two story building to all one floor. In 2018, Park Elementary received an early childhood wing that included six new classrooms. These classrooms are used for pre-k and kindergarten students.

    Historical factors that have influenced the writing of this school's SCHOOL STORY 
    • Socio-economic community issues (employment, income levels, housing costs)
    • Significant changes over time in student/community demographics
    • Access (or lack of access) to community financial programs
    • Access to (or lack of access) to public transportation
    • Access (or lack of access) to community social programs
    • Access (or lack of access) to community health-related programs
    • Access (or lack of access) to community academic support programs
    • Significant increase/reduction in student enrollment numbers

Existing School Culture

  • Park Elementary School is committed to realizing outstanding outcomes in the areas of RELATIONSHIPS, RIGOR & READINESS across the next five years. We will develop an even stronger partnership with our school community to ensure that all students, families, and community members feel welcomed, celebrated, and appreciated. Drawing upon the diversity among our learners and leaders, we will leverage their knowledge, skills, and experiences to create opportunities for our students to explore, learn, and practice core content and critical skills. Furthermore, we are committed to fostering a school climate and culture that provides students with a safe and supportive environment where they feel valued and supported every day. This very intentional work will actualize value number one, All means All. Park Elementary boasts a history of career-teachers who make our school their permanent home. This consistency among faculty allows us to retain quality teachers that have deep pedagogical and content knowledge affording us opportunities to implement our curriculum with confidence and fidelity while challenging our students to think critically about the content daily. Ready, Set, Launch, the second value in our strategic plan, deals in part with having full access to a viable curriculum and preparing for college and career. Here at Park, that is our collective mission.


    School-Community Interaction

    • Adult-Adult (in adult-adult interactions, interpersonal relationships reveal a high level of respect, trust, empathy and compassion)
      Most of the time
    • Adult-Student (teacher or administrator-students) (in adult and student interactions, interpersonal relationships reveal a high level of respect, trust, empathy and compassion)
      Most of the time
    • Student-Student (in student to student interactions, interpersonal relationships reveal a high level of respect, trust, empathy and compassion)
      Most of the time
    • School-Parent (in school-parent interactions, interpersonal relationships reveal a high level of respect, trust, empathy and compassion)
      Most of the time
    • School-Community Stakeholder (in school-community stakeholder interactions, interpersonal relationships reveal a high level of respect, trust, empathy and compassion)
      Always
    • School Support Staff-Student (secretaries, bus drivers, food services workers, etc.) (in school support staff-student interactions, interpersonal relationships reveal a high level of respect, trust, empathy and compassion)
      Most of the time
  • DEMOGRAPHICS
    ATTENDANCE RATE (%)
    95.4
    Total Enrollment
    497
    Race/Ethnicity (%)
    African American  25
    Hawaii/Pac. Islander  -
    White  34
    2+  7
    Hispanic 29.6
    American Indian/AK -
    Asian 3.6
    GENDER (%)
    Male 50.3 
    Female  49.7
    Special Services (%)
    FARMS 83.8
    504 3
    Special Ed 9.5
    LEP 15.1
    Title 1 Yes