• DEMOGRAPHICS
    YEAR SCHOOL OPENED
    1896
    ATTENDANCE RATE (%)
    94.9
    student Enrollment
    254
    Race/Ethnicity (%)
    African American....................... 52.5
    Hawaii/Pac. Islander.......................... -
    White.............................. 22.9
    Multiracial...................... -
    Hispanic......................... 17.8
    American Indian/AK....................... -
    Asian.............................. -
    GENDER (%)
    Male................................ 52.1 
    Female........................... 47.9
    Special Services** (%)
    FARMS........................... 63.3
    504.................................. -
    Special Ed..................... 10.2
    LEP................................. 10.6
    Title 1............................. YES

     **Special Services Terms Glossary

    School Renovation Details - 2014 The original "Green Street" school building was
    connected to the "old" Board of Education Building to create a large learning complex. The structure was completely renovated top to bottom, maintaining the
    historical look and integrity of the original structure. However, the building was brought into the 21st Century with enhanced technology and security.

Annapolis Elementary School

Key Challenges to Student Success

  • The students who attend Annapolis Elementary School are influenced daily by events, situations, and circumstances that occur at home and in their neighborhood.  While there are numerous factors that contribute to student achievement at Annapolis Elementary, the school leadership team has narrowed its focus to the following challenges to student success, with the acknowledgement that this is not an all-inclusive list and that some students may be affected by other opportunities or issues in their young lives. 

    This school's key challenges to student success are also noted in the boxes shown below.

  • Traditional MSDE and/or school-based student challenges

    • Discipline Rates
    • Numbers of FARMS students
    • Title I Status
    • Quarterly Assessments scores - English
    • Quarterly Assessments scores - Mathematics
    • PARCC Scores - Mathematics (Elementary grades 3, 4, 5)
    • PARCC Scores - English/Language Arts (Elementary grades 3, 4, 5)

    In the 17-18 school year, 120 discipline referrals were written, 27 of which resulted in out-of-school suspension. Further, our MDS survey shows that 18% of students and 31% of staff do not feel safe at school. Only 35% of students and 43% of staff feel that students obey the rules. There was a decrease in the feeling of belonging by students between the 15-16 and 17-18 school years. Additionally, students reporting liking the school decreased between the 16-17 and 17-18 school year. Our work to build teacher capacity to implement rigorous instruction will continue in the 18-19 school year. However, we continue to see the need to support our youngest readers for them to reach grade level expectations on F & P assessments. Of the 100 students in grades K – 2, 49 students (49%) were approaching or did not meet grade level expectations.

    Of the 125 students in grade K - 2 in the 16-17 school year, 44 students (35%) were  approaching or did not meet grade level expectations in reading as defined by the Fountas and Pinnell assessment. In the 17-18 school year, 0ff the 100 students in grades K – 2 49 students (49%) were approaching or did not meet grade level expectations. As noted above, our students continue to struggle to meet grade level expectations in reading.

  • Non-Traditional Socio-Economic Challenges

    • Socio-Economic Issues (employment, income levels, housing costs)
    • Families in Crisis (mental, physical emotional, financial)
    • Inclusion of activity buses
    • Inclusion of Clubs

    AES is a Title 1 school, having requalified for Title 1 in the 2015-2016 school year. The Title 1 status was lost when the "Clay Street" community residents were relocated throughout the city during redevelopment and revitalization of the area. When residents moved back into the community, the number of FARMS students rose again, placing AES in Title 1 status again. At this time we are Targeted Assistance Title 1; we have not undergone the process with the state to regain school-wide status.

    Like many families nationwide, many of our students and/or their families have experienced crisis and trauma. This has manifested itself into ongoing behavior concerns inside the schoolhouse. We have seen a rise in our discipline rates including increases in referrals and suspensions. The trauma students experience does not turn off at the schoolhouse door. We have integrated Restorative practices into our school day with the implementation of daily Community Circles. Building relationships with students is the key to guiding students to success. Community Circles along with the Kids at Hope philosophy and language are integral in these relationships. The PTA, an active and integral part of the school community, has made it their mission to provide our students with opportunities beyond the classroom. In the 17-18 school year, students were provided many after school opportunities that included transportation.

  • HISTORICAL SCHOOL & COMMUNITY CHALLENGES THAT HAVE INFLUENCED THE WRITING OF THIS SCHOOL'S STORY

    • Socio-economic community issues (employment, income levels, housing costs)
    • Significant changes over time in student/community demographics

  • Annapolis Elem