• AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)

    AVID is an academic program designed to provide support to students who are in the “academic” middle. This elective is currently being offered to students in grades 6 through 12. AVID students apply to be in the program and actually interview with teachers before being accepted into the elective.

    These students want to work harder and be more successful, committing themselves to a variety of obligations-including good attendance, appropriate behavior, and 1-2 hours of homework per night (an approximate total for all classes).

    Visit the AACPS AVID page

     

    IB MYP

    IB Middle Years Programme – FAQ

    What makes the MYP different from other programs?

    • The MYP is an 5-year program of study that focuses on three fundamental concepts: intercultural awareness, communication, and holistic education
    • The first three years (6-8) of the program are housed at Old Mill Middle School North and the last two years (9-10) of the program are completed at Old Mill High School.
    • MYP teachers organize the curriculum with appropriate attention to:
      • Teaching and learning in context. Students learn best when their learning experiences have context and are connected to their lives and the world that they have experienced. Using global contexts, MYP students explore human identity, global challenges and what it means to be internationally minded.
      • Conceptual understanding. Concepts are big ideas that have relevance within specific disciplines and across subject areas. MYP students use concepts as a vehicle to inquire into issues and ideas of personal, local and global significance and examine knowledge holistically.
      • Approaches to learning (ATL). A unifying thread throughout all MYP subject groups, approaches to learning provide the foundation for independent learning and encourage the application of their knowledge and skills in unfamiliar contexts. Developing and applying these skills help students learn how to learn.
      • Service as action (community service). Action (learning by doing and experiencing) and service have always been shared values of the IB community. Students take action when they apply what they are learning in the classroom and beyond. IB learners strive to be caring members of the community who demonstrate a commitment to service—making a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment. Service as action is an integral part of the programme, especially in the MYP community project.
      • Language and identity. MYP students are required to learn at least two languages. Learning to communicate in a variety of ways is fundamental to their development of intercultural understanding and crucial to their identity affirmation.

     

    • What is the advantage to being a MYP student? ◦addresses holistically students’ intellectual, social, emotional and physical well-being
      • provides students opportunities to develop the knowledge, attitudes and skills they need in order to manage complexity and take responsible action for the future
      • ensures breadth and depth of understanding through study in eight subject groups
      • requires the study of at least two languages (language of instruction and additional language of choice) to support students in understanding their own cultures and those of others
      • empowers students to participate in service within the community
      • helps to prepare students for further education, the workplace and a lifetime of learning.
    • How much homework will my child have? ◦The philosophy of the MYP is to provide quality assignments versus quantitative work. Initially assignments may take more time until students become comfortable with utilizing higher level thinking skills.
      • MYP teaching staff attempt to coordinate assignments, tests and projects to help students manage their workload.
    • How many classes will my child take? ◦MYP students take 9 classes. Students take four core classes (Math, Science, Individuals & Societies, and Language & Literature) on a daily basis in grades 6, 7 and 8.
      • In grades 6 and 7, students take a world language course and a physical education/health course every other day. In grades 6 and 7, students are completing level 1 of a high school world language and may earn high school credit if they pass the final exam. Finally, students may select three additional courses, one of which must be an Arts class, one of which must be a Design class, and one of their choosing.
      • In grade 8, students take a world language course every day. In grade 8, students are completing level 2 of a high school world language and may earn high school credit if they pass the final exam. All 8th grade students participate in physical education/health every third day. Finally, students may select two additional courses, one of which must be an Arts class and one of which must be a Design class.
    • How long is the school day? ◦Our doors open at 8:55 for breakfast. First period begins at 9:05 and we end at 3:50.
    • How will my child get to and from school? ◦For students whose home school is Old Mill Middle School North, they may be bus riders if they live more than 1.5 miles away from the school. Those that live within 1.5 miles of the school will walk to school.
      • For students who apply to MYP from the Old Mill Middle South area, they will either be walkers (if they live with 1.5 miles of the school) or ride their neighborhood bus to the Old Mill Complex and enter Old Mill North through the main lobby.
      • For students who apply to MYP from out of area, consolidated bus stops are available to transport students to OMMN. These are typically at local elementary, middle and high schools.
    • Will my child be able to participate in extra-curricular activities? ◦All students are highly encouraged to participate in before and after school clubs to expose them to different areas of interest. Students whose home school is Old Mill Middle North or Old Mill Middle South may ride an activity bus home at 4:45. Consolidated bus stops are also available on Tuesdays and Thursdays ONLY. Stops go to local libraries. Activities on other days will require transportation.

    IB Middle Years Programme Philosophy

    IB Mission Statement

    The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

    To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

    These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

    IB Learner Profile

    At the center of an IB curriculum, are the learner Profile Traits. IB encourages students to become active, compassionate lifelong learners. An IB education is holistic in nature—it is concerned with the whole person. Along with cognitive development, IB programmes and qualifications address students’ social, emotional and physical well-being. They value and offer opportunities for students to become active and caring members of local, national and global communities; they focus attention on the processes and the outcomes of internationally minded learning described in the IB learner profile.

    Inquirers: We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. We know how to learn independently and with others. We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning throughout life.

    Knowledgeable: We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global significance.

    Thinkers: We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions.

    Communicators: We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

    Principled: We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their consequences.

    Open-minded: We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

    Caring: We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

    Risk-takers: We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

    Balanced: We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of our lives–intellectual, physical, and emotional–to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live.

    Reflective: We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

    IB Philosophy in the MYP

    This philosophy, framed in What is an IB education? (2013), is expressed through all aspects of the MYP. The programme has been developed with developmentally appropriate attention to:
    •conceptual understanding
    •teaching and learning in context
    •approaches to learning (ATL)
    •service as action (community service)
    •language and identity
    •learning diversity and inclusion.

    Teaching and Learning in the IB

    An IB education empowers young people for a lifetime of learning, both independently and in collaboration with others. It prepares a community of learners to engage with complex global challenges through a dynamic educational experience framed by inquiry, action and reflection.

    Global Engagement

    Global engagement represents a commitment to address humanity’s greatest challenges in the classroom and beyond. It can develop from the use of global contexts in inquiry leading to principled action. IB programmes provide for sustained inquiry into a wide range of issues and ideas of significance locally, nationally and globally. From the community project to working with classrooms in other countries across the globe, OMMN engages students in an internationally-minded education.

     

    IB MYP Curriculum

    Academics: All students must participate in eight required subjects
    •Language & Literature’s aim is to encourage students to use language as a vehicle for thought, creativity, reflection, learning, self-expression, analysis and social interactions, as well as develop the skills involved in listening, speaking, reading, writing viewing and presenting in a variety of contexts. Texts will represent a variety of historical periods and cultures.
    •Language Acquisition – students may select French, Spanish or Chinese. IB promotes multilingualism and intercultural understanding by developing opportunities for students to develop the craft of language and the concept of culture.
    •Individuals & Societies, similar to social studies, aims to help students become responsible citizens of local and global communities by developing inquiry skills that will better their understanding of the relationships between individuals, societies, and the environments in which they live.
    •Science aims to guide students to independently and collaboratively investigate issues through research, observation and experimentation. Students reflect on the ethical, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental implications of using science to solve problems.
    •Mathematics encourages students to develop an understanding of the principles of mathematics by developing logical, critical, and creative thinking in a wide range of real-life situations. Students develop powers of generalizations and abstraction through the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives. Students take either Common Core or STEM math (accelerated).
    •Health and Physical Education develops skills to develop and achieve a healthy and balanced lifestyle physically, mentally, and socially.
    •Design – students may select Family and Consumer Science (FACS), Project Runway or Technology Education. Students develop knowledge, understanding, and skills from different disciplines to design and create solutions to problems using the Design Cycle.
    •The Arts – this is satisfied by participating in any one of the following: Dance, Band, Orchestra, Percussion, Music Goes Global, Visual Art or Chorus (based on our schedule, students may actually participate in 2 if they choose to do so).
    •In addition, students may select from a number of other electives, such as Team Sports, Reading Intervention, Math Intervention, and AVID.

    Global Contexts

    IB MYP teachers develop holistic learning and international mindedness in students by actively engaging students in each subject in the six Global Contexts. These areas serve as “lenses” through which students explore ideas, investigate connections across and between subject areas, and apply their knowledge to real world problems.

    Identities and relationships

    Who we are: an inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human.

    Orientation in space and time

    Where we are in place and time: an inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between, and the interconnectedness of, individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives.

    Personal and cultural expression

    How we express ourselves: an inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

    Scientific and technical innovation

    How the world works: an inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

    Globalization and sustainability

    How we organize ourselves: an inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

    Fairness and development

    Sharing the planet: an inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

    Approaches to Learning Skills

    At Old Mill Middle North, an IB World School we help students develop skills to become successful, lifelong learners. Students learn skills related to:

    Self-Management: Organization and Affective
    •Goal setting and organization of learning materials
    •Practice strategies for focus, positive thinking, developing mental quiet, and ‘bouncing back after adversity and failure

    Social & Collaboration
    •Working effectively with others for the success of all
    •Manage and resolve conflict
    •Advocate for your own rights and needs

    Communication
    •Communicate with a variety of media and audiences
    •Communicate effectively in more than one language

    Research Skills: Information & Media Literacy
    •Access, analyze, and evaluate information to be informed and inform others
    •Seek a range of perspectives from multiple and varied voices
    •Demonstrate an awareness of bias and interpretations of events and ideas

    Reflection
    •Awareness of strengths and areas of improvement
    •Reflecting throughout the learning process to develop new skills and strategies
    •Consider ethical, cultural, and environmental implications

    Thinking (Critical and Creative)
    •Create novel solutions to complex problems
    •Consider ideas from multiple perspectives
    •Draw reasonable conclusions/ generalizations and test them
    •Identify obstacles and challenges

    Transfer
    •Use effective skills and knowledge across subjects and disciplines
    •Apply skills and knowledge in unfamiliar situations
    •Inquire in different contexts to gain different perspectives
    •Combine knowledge, understanding and skills to create products or solutions

    Community Project

    In the final year of MYP middle school (8th grade) students will prepare a community project. Based on personal interests, students will address a need within a community. Beginning in the fall, students will research and design an action plan and present the results in the spring. It is an opportunity to make a change in the world and show their approaches to learning skills developed over the middle school years.

    Personal Project

    In the final year of the MYP (10th grade) students prepare a personal project rather than academic project. It will be an independent piece of work of the student’s choosing intended to demonstrate the student’s achievements and involvement with the Approach to Learning Skills. Students are required to choose a Global Context in which to base their inquiry. Students begin their Personal Project in 9th grade and present it in 10th grade.

     

    MYP Assessments

    Old Mill Middle North – MYP Assessments

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    Science – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    A scientific investigation designed and carried out independently by the student ·      The student states a clear focused problem or research question, formulates a testable hypothesis and explains the hypothesis using scientific reasoning.

     

    ·      The student selects appropriate materials and equipment and writes a clear, logical method, mentioning all of the relevant variables involved and how to control and manipulate them, and describing how the data will be collected and processed.

    ·      The student evaluates the method, commenting on its reliability and validity.

    ·      The student comments on the validity of the hypothesis based on the outcome of the investigation.

    ·      The student suggests realistic improvements to the method and makes suggestions for further inquiry when relevant.

    ·      The student organizes, transforms and presents data in numerical and/or visual forms logically and correctly.

    ·      The student describes a trend, pattern or relationship in the data and comments on the reliability of the data.

    ·      The student draws a clear conclusion based on the correct interpretation of the data and explains it using scientific reasoning.

    ·      The student requires no guidance to work safely and uses material and equipment competently.

    ·      The student works responsibly with regards to the living and non-living environment.

    ·      When working as part of a group, the student cooperates with others.

    An end-of-unit ·      The student uses scientific ideas, concepts and/or processes correctly to construct scientific explanations.

     

    ·      The student applies scientific understanding to solve complex problems including those in unfamiliar situations.

    ·      The student analyses and evaluates scientific information and makes judgments supported by scientific understanding

    A piece of writing by the student (Grade 6 – approximately 700 words, Grade 7 – approximately 825 words, Grade 8 – approximately 950 words.) ·      The student explains how science is applied and how it may be used to address a specific problem or issue in a local or global context.

     

    ·      The student discusses the effectiveness of science and its application in solving the problem or issue.

    ·      The student discusses and evaluates the implications of the use and application of science interacting with at least two of the following factors: moral, ethical, social, economic, political, cultural and environmental.

    ·      The student uses sufficient scientific language correctly.

    ·      The student communicates scientific information effectively.

    ·      When appropriate to the task, the student fully documents sources of information correctly.

     

    Humanities – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    A piece of extended writing (Grade 6 – approximately 700 words, Grade 7 –900 words, Grade 8- 1100 words) ·   The student uses a range of humanities terminology accurately and appropriately.

     

    ·   The student demonstrates detailed knowledge and understanding of content and concepts through thorough descriptions, explanations and examples.

    ·   The student formulates a clear and focused research question.

    ·   The student follows an action plan effectively to investigate a research question.

    ·   The student uses methods accurately to collect and record appropriate and varied information in line with the research question.

    ·   The student effectively addresses the research question.

    ·   The student completes a detailed analysis of concepts, events, issues, models or arguments.

    ·   The student effectively analyses and evaluates a range of sources in terms of origin and purpose, recognizing values and limitations.

    ·   The student clearly recognizes a range of different perspectives and their implications.

    ·   The student makes connections between information to make valid and well supported arguments.

    ·   The student communicates information and ideas in a style that is completely appropriate to the audience and purpose.

    ·   The student structures information and ideas completely according to the task instructions.

    ·   The student creates a list of sources of information according to the task instructions.

    A test
    An assignment of choice (selected by the teacher)

     

     

    The Arts* – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    Units of work that assess students on all of the following.   (This can be accomplished beginning from the drafting stage all the way through to the finished product and reflection and evaluation.) ·      The student is able to demonstrate excellent knowledge and understanding of the art form studied in relation to societal or cultural or historical or personal contexts.

     

    ·      The student is able to demonstrate excellent knowledge and understanding of the elements of the art form studied.

    ·      The student is able to communicate a welldeveloped critical understanding of the art form studied, in the context of his or her own work.

    ·      The student is able to elaborate an idea, a theme or a personal interpretation to a point of realization. There is evidence of purposeful expression and effective communication of artistic intentions.

    ·      Skills and techniques are applied at a high level of proficiency.

    ·      The student shows an excellent ability to apply the artistic processes involved in creating art.

    ·      The student reflects critically and in depth on his or her artistic development and processes at different stages of his or her work.

    ·      The student carries out an excellent evaluation of his or her work. This shows a considered appraisal of the quality of work produced and details of improvements that could be made.

    ·      The student intentionally uses feedback in his or her artistic development, which shows an appropriate consideration of his or her artistic processes.

    ·      The student shows excellent commitment in using his or her own artistic processes.

    ·      The student actively demonstrates curiosity, self‑motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks.

    ·      The student actively supports, encourages and works with his or her peers in a positive way.

    ·      The student is actively receptive to art practices and artworks from various cultures, including his or her own.

     

    * Dance, Music Goes Global, Orchestra, Band, Percussion, Chorus, Visual Art

     

     

     

     

    Language A – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    One essay (literary, argumentative, persuasive or analytical piece of writing) (Grade 6 – approximately 500 words, grade 7 – approximately 625 words, grade 8 – approximately 750 words) ·      The student demonstrates a perceptive understanding of the text, topic and the author’s choices, consistently using illustrative detail, development and support.

     

    ·      In creative work, pieces reflect a lot of imagination and sensitivity; the student employs literary and/or non-literary features effectively that serve the context and intention.

    ·      The student shows a sophisticated command of relevant terminology, and uses it appropriately.

    ·      The student consistently employs sophisticated organizational structures and language-specific conventions that serve the context and intention.

    ·      The work is consistently well-organized, clear and coherent and the ideas being expressed build on each other in a sophisticated manner.

    ·      The student integrates critical apparatus correctly and effectively.

    ·      The student employs a wide and effective range of appropriate vocabulary, idiom and sentence structure.

    ·      Grammar and syntax are accurate; very infrequent errors do not hinder communication.

    ·      The student demonstrates mastery of a register and style that serve the context and intention.

    ·      Punctuation and spelling are accurate; very infrequent errors do not hinder communication.

    ·      In oral/presentation work there is a high level of competence in oratory technique.

    One piece of creative writing (for example, poetry, short story, dramatic scene, pastiche) of a maximum of 1,000 words , plus an optional rationale of a maximum of 300 words
    One response to literature

     

    Option A: a written personal response, demonstrating the student’s ability to approach work in an independent fashion, (Grade 6 – approximately 500 words, grade 7 – approximately 625 words, grade 8 – approximately 750 words)

    Option B: an oral personal response, demonstrating the student’s ability to approach work in an independent fashion, of 3–5 minutes in length.

     

     

     

    Mathematics – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    A broad-based classroom test/examination composed of a range of questions and problems, in familiar and unfamiliar situations, covering at least three of the branches of the framework for mathematics, and which allows students to reach all levels of achievement. (Criterion A is strongly recommended as one of the criteria used to assess this task.)

     

     

    ·        The student consistently makes appropriate deductions when solving challenging problems in a variety of contexts including unfamiliar situations.

     

    ·        The student shows good use of mathematical language and forms of mathematical representation.

    ·        The lines of reasoning are concise, logical and complete.

    ·        The student moves effectively between different forms of representation.

    A mathematical investigation, done under test conditions, where students are given the opportunity to recognize patterns, describe them as relationships or general rules and justify or prove them. (Criterion B is strongly recommended as one of the criteria used to assess this task.) ·        The student selects and applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, describes them as relationships or general rules, draws the correct conclusions consistent with the correct findings, and provides justifications or a proof.
    A real-life problem where students are given the opportunity to apply mathematics to a real-life context, reflect upon and evaluate their findings. (Criterion D is essential as one of the criteria used to assess this task.) ·        The student critically explains whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem.

     

    ·        The student provides a detailed explanation of the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life where appropriate.

    ·        The student justifies the degree of accuracy of his or her results where appropriate.

    ·        The student suggests improvements to his or her method where appropriate.

    ·        The student shows good use of mathematical language and forms of mathematical representation.

    ·        The lines of reasoning are concise, logical and complete.

    ·        The student moves effectively between different forms of representation.

     

     

     

     

    Technology* – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    Units of work that assess students on all of the following.   (This can be accomplished beginning from the drafting stage all the way through to the finished product and reflection and evaluation.) ·         The student explains the problem, discussing its relevance.

     

    ·         The student critically investigates the problem, evaluating information from a broad range of appropriate, acknowledged sources.

    ·         The student describes detailed methods for appropriate testing to evaluate the product/solution against the design specification.

    ·         The student generates a range of feasible designs, each evaluated against the design specification.

    ·         The student justifies the chosen design and evaluates it fully and critically against the design specification.

    ·         The student produces a plan that contains a number of detailed, logical steps that describe the use of resources and time.

    ·         The student critically evaluates the plan and justifies any modifications to the design.

    ·         The student competently uses appropriate techniques and equipment.

    ·         The student follows the plan and justifies any modifications made, resulting in a product/solution of appropriate quality using the resources available.

    ·         The student evaluates the success of the product/solution in an objective manner based on the results of testing, and the views of the intended users.

    ·         The student provides an evaluation of his or her own performance at each stage of the design cycle and suggests improvements.

    ·         The student provides an appropriate evaluation of the impact of the product/solution on life, society and/or the environment.

    ·         The student consistently displays a satisfactory standard in both personal engagement (motivation, independence, general positive attitude) and attitudes towards safety, cooperation and respect for others.

     

    * Project Runway, Family and Consumer Sciences, Design Technology

     

     

     

     

     

    Physical Education – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    Two pieces of written work that show the student’s use of physical education knowledge. ·         The student uses a wide range of physical education terminology accurately and appropriately in most situations.

     

    ·         Demonstrates a thorough knowledge of principles, concepts, strategies, techniques and rules related to the physical education topic or activity.

    ·         Uses this knowledge wisely and effectively to analyze and solve problems in familiar and unfamiliar situations.

    Video evidence of the student performing their own composition. Written evidence that demonstrates that the student actually composed the sequence him/herself must be included. ·         The student selects, adapts and creates a wide range of aesthetic moves that are appropriate to the requirements of the task.

     

    ·         The sequence shows a sophisticated use of space, time, level, force and flow.

    ·         The composition is coherent, and shows aspects of imagination, creativity and style.

    ·         The student shows a high level of competence in both basic and complex moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation.

    ·         The student applies movement concepts, tactics, strategies and rules in a critical and effective manner.

    ·         The student performs with a high degree of precision, synchronization, energy, style and flair.

    Video evidence of the student’s performance in another physical activity. ·         The student shows a high level of competence in both basic and complex moves, skills and techniques in the performance or playing situation.

     

    ·         The student applies movement concepts, tactics, strategies and rules in a critical and effective manner.

    ·         The student performs with a high degree of precision, synchronization, energy, style and flair.

    Teacher assessment of social skills and personal engagement ·         The student demonstrates attitudes and strategies that improve their communication and relationships with others.

     

    ·         The student consistently shows respect and sensitivity to themselves, others and the physical environment.

    ·         The student takes responsibility for their own learning and usually shows enthusiasm and commitment to physical education.

    ·         The student reflects critically on their own achievements, sets appropriate goals and takes some action towards achieving them.

     

     

     

    Language B* – Assessment in MYP
    Type of task required What are the indicators for success?
    One recording of an interactive oral task conducted under supervision in class. This can be recorded on an audio cassette, CD or DVD. ·      The student identifies basic information in everyday situations.

     

    ·      The student responds appropriately to most simple short phrases.

    ·      The student interacts in simple and rehearsed exchanges, using verbal and nonverbal language.

    ·      The student communicates information on a variety of aspects of a topic in everyday situations.

    ·      The student makes excellent use of a basic range of vocabulary, generally accurately.

    ·      The student uses clear pronunciation and intonation, which makes communication easy.

    ·      The student uses language to suit the context.

    One visual interpretation task completed under supervision in class ·      The student identifies basic messages, main ideas and supporting details in simple visual texts dealing with everyday situations.

     

    ·      The student recognizes basic conventions in visual texts dealing with everyday situations.

    ·      The student engages with the visual text by identifying ideas, opinions and attitudes in the text and makes substantial connections with own experiences and attitudes.

    ·      The student shows thorough understanding of the content of the visual, spoken and written text as a whole.

    One reading comprehension task completed under supervision in class ·      The student identifies basic facts, more complex ideas and supporting details in simple short written texts with familiar language.

     

    ·      The student recognizes basic aspects of format and style, and author’s purpose for writing

    ·      The student engages with the text by identifying ideas, opinions and attitudes in the text and making substantial connections with own experiences and attitudes.

    ·      The student shows thorough understanding of the content of the text as a whole.

    One writing task produced under supervision in class ·      The student writes a wide variety of basic phrases effectively to express ideas and feelings in a limited range of everyday situations.

     

    ·      The student organizes basic information and uses a range of basic cohesive devices.

    ·      The student makes excellent use of a basic range of vocabulary, grammatical structures and conventions, generally accurately.

    ·      The student writes with a sense of audience.

    * French, Mandarin Chinese, Spanish

     

     

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