• Parents’ Role in Children’s Self-Esteem


    Self-esteem is an indicator of good mental health. It is how we feel about ourselves. Poor self-esteem is nothing to be blamed for, ashamed of or  embarrassed about. Some self-doubt, particularly during adolescence, is normal— even healthy— but poor self-esteem should not be ignored. In some instances, it can be a symptom of a mental health disorder or emotional disturbance.

    Parents can play important roles in helping their children feel better about themselves and developing greater confidence.

    Doing this is important because children with good self-esteem:

    • Act independently
    • Assume responsibility
    • Take pride in their accomplishments
    • Tolerate frustration
    • Handle peer pressure appropriately
    • Attempt new tasks and challenges
    • Handle positive and negative emotions
    • Help other peers

    Words and actions have great impact on the confidence of children. Children — including adolescents — remember the positive statements parents and caregivers say to them.

    Phrases such as “I like the way you” or “you are improving at” or “I appreciate the way you” should be used on a daily basis.
    Parents also can smile, nod, wink, pat on the back or hug a child to show attention and appreciation.

    What else can parents do?

    • Be generous with praise. Parents should develop the habit of looking for situations in which children are doing good jobs, displaying talents or demonstrating positive character traits.
    • Teach positive self-statements. It is important for parents to redirect children’s inaccurate or negative beliefs about themselves and to teach them how to think in positive ways.
    • Avoid criticism that takes the form of ridicule or shame. Blame and negative judgments are at the core of poor selfesteem and can lead to emotional disorders.
    • Teach children about decision making and to recognize when they have made good decisions. Let them “own” their problems. If they solve them, they gain confidence in themselves. If you solve them, they’ll remain dependent on you. Take the time to answer questions and help children think of alternative options.
    • Show children that you can laugh at yourself. Show them that life doesn’t need to be serious all the time and that some teasing is all in fun. Your sense of humor is important for their well-being.

    Why Social Media is Not Smart for Middle School Kids

    Read article: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mental-wealth/201703/why-social-media-is-not-smart-middle-school-kids


    Gifted Visual Arts Enrichment Program

    Students who enjoy Art and would like to develop a portfolio should apply to participate in the Gifted Visual Arts Enrichment Program. It will meet for ten Saturday sessions in the winter-November thru March, at Southern High School. There is no fee for this program.

    Portfolio application information is on the AACPS website. Please visit: www.aacps.org/art

    If you have any questions, please contact Eleni Dykstra, Coordinator of Visual Arts, at 410-222-5450 or edykstra@aacps.org.


    Honors electives and AP/H courses at GBHS

    Why should you take Honors level courses?

    Watch Video

    Are you considering taking Honors courses? Did you know that in addition to core Honors courses, there are also Honors courses for electives? Check out this video to see why so many high school students enjoy taking advanced courses. If you may need extra support for your advanced classes, check out the AVID website and see how this College Preparatory Course can assist you with becoming college ready at https://www.aacps.org/avid .


    Enrolling your student

    Information on how to enroll your child in Anne Arundel County Public Schools


    For more information please call 410-761-0088




Additional Information