Anne Arundel
County Public SchoolsTitle I

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Contact Information
(410) 222-5444

for information about upcoming events  sponsored by our office 

2014 - 2015 AACPS
Title I Elementary Schools
 

Belle Grove
Eastport
Ferndale
Freetown
Georgetown East
Germantown
Hilltop
Marley
Maryland City
Meade Heights
Mills Parole
North Glen
Park
Tyler Heights
Van Bokkelen
Woodside

   

What is Title I?

Title I Office Mission Statement: The mission of the Title I Office is to provide additional support-above and beyond what other elementary schools receive from county funding- to help meet the educational needs of low-achieving students in Anne Arundel County’s highest-poverty elementary schools.

Title I Vision: The Title I Office will collaborate with county offices and community members to provide resources to enhance teaching and learning in order to close achievement gaps and help meet the challenging academic performance standards for all students, teachers, and parents in Title I schools.

Title I Law - http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/index.html

In the News

Louise Dejesu, Principal of Title I School Hilltop Elementary wins Person of the Year Award  

STEM Teacher Kris Hanks, Teacher at Woodside Elementary wins Presidential Award for STEM Education

How Will Title I Help My Child?

The Title program will provide your child with extra educational assistance beyond the regular classroom. In most cases these additional services will include all or some of the following services:

  • Smaller classes or special instructional spaces.
  • Additional teachers and aides.
  • Opportunities for professional development for school staff.
  • Extra time for teaching Title I students the skills they need.
  • A variety of supplementary teaching methods.
  • An individualized program for students.
  • Additional teaching materials which supplement their regular instruction.
     

How Do Schools Receive Title I Funds?

The federal government provides funding to each state.  State educational agencies send this money to school districts.  The number of low-income students attending each school is the determining factor for how much money each school will receive, if any.